ISG Winter Meeting 2015

Nutrition Prize

Patricia Dominguez Castro
St James's Hospital, Dublin

Poster (15W124)

Co-existence of coeliac disease and other autoimmune conditions in a cohort of Irish coeliac patients.

Author(s)

P. Dominguez Castro1, G. Harkin3, M. Hussey4, B. Christopher5, C. Kiat3, J. Liong Chin1, V. Trimble1, T. Martin2, D. McNamara4, P. MacMathuna2, B. Egan6, D. Kevans1, NP. Kennedy1, R. Farrell5, N. Mahmud1, V. Byrnes3, R.McManus1.

Department(s)/Institutions

1Institute of Molecular Medicine & Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Science, St James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Republic of Ireland, 2Gastrointestinal Unit, Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Eccles St., Dublin 7, Republic of Ireland, 3Department of Clinical Medicine, University College Hospital Galway, Galway, Republic of Ireland, 4Department of Clinical Medicine, The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Dublin 24, Republic of Ireland, 5Connolly Hospital Blanchardstown, Blancharsdtown, Dublin 15, Republic of Ireland, 6Department of Clinical Medicine, Mayo General Hospital, Castlebar, Co Mayo, republic of Ireland.

Introduction

Coeliac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated condition characterized by a highly heterogeneous clinical presentation and associated complications (1, 2). The co-occurrence of CD with other autoimmune conditions has been well reported in the literature (3). However, this aspect has not been well explored in Irish patients.

Aims/Background

The aim of this study is to explore the coexistence of other autoimmune conditions in a cohort of CD patients (n=564).

Method

Retrospective analysis of medical charts from a cohort of coeliac patients (n=564) (median age 57 years, range 16-88 years) attending referral centres. Standardized ratios (SR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated from prevalence data from the literature (4-6).

Results

134 patients (30.9%) had a coexistent autoimmune disorder, the most prevalent being thyroid disease (20.6%), followed by type 1 diabetes (T1DM) (3.2%) and psoriasis (3.2%). Type 1 diabetes presented prior to CD in most cases, however presentation of Thyroid disorders and psoriasis occurred equally prior or after CD diagnosis. Thyroid disorders were more prevalent in women than in men (ratio 6.7:1, p<0.001). Patients with thyroid disease were diagnosed later in life with this condition (median=47 years) compared to those with T1DM or psoriasis (median=33 years) (p=0.003). Standardized ratios for thyroid disorders and T1DM (5.4; 95% CI 4.5, 6.3 and 10.6; 95% CI 5.8, 15.4 respectively).

Conclusions

CD patients seem to be predisposed to develop other co-existent autoimmune conditions such as thyroid disorders, T1DM and psoriasis. Standardized ratios suggest a high predisposition to T1DM and thyroid disorders in our sample.